Jalisco makes progress in Criminal Justice System reform

Judge Suro Esteves speaks to an audience.

Judge Ricardo Suro Esteves, President of the Jalisco Supreme Court of Justice. Source: Francisco Rodriguez, El Occidental.

12/16/18 (written by Kimberly Heinle) — Beginning in 2019, the State of Jalisco’s judiciary will utilize electronic signatures on documents and for digital sentencing. According to the President of the state’s Supreme Court of Justice, Ricardo Suro Esteves, “Our judiciary will use electronic signatures, which will move us forward into the digital realm, making the administration and implementation of our justice system more efficient.” He continued, “With this technological advance, for the first time we are utilizing digital documents and sentencing with judicial validity.”

This progress reflects the effects of the New Criminal Justice System (Nuevo Sistema de Justicia Penal, NSJP). The NSJP was intended to modernize judicial processes in Mexico, creating efficiency and expediency in the otherwise notoriously slow system. The transition to a more digital approach to courtroom and judicial proceedings increases their speed and efficiency while decreasing associated costs, added Judge Suro.

Jalisco also made progress with regards to the training that 5,000 police and traffic cops have gone through that covers their roles as first responder at crime scenes. This is part of the three workshops related to the New Criminal Justice System that police are required to complete. Judges and judicial system operators in Jalisco have also undergone training and seen a boost in salaries. Additionally, two new courtrooms have been built that will process oral trade law in Ocotlán and family law in Ciudad Judicial.

Judge Suro was reelected as the President of the Jalisco Supreme Court on December 14, 2018. His second two-year term will cover January 1, 2019 through December 31, 2020.

Sources:

“Police lack training in the New Criminal Justice System.” Justice in Mexico. December 4, 2018.

Bareño, Rosario. “Digitalización y primer Observatorio Judicial en el Poder Judicial: Suro Esteves.” El Occidental. December 7, 2018.

Rivas Uribe, Rodrígo. “Preparan operación de firma electrónica en el Poder Judicial del Estado.” Informador. December 7, 2018.

Ruíz, Luís Antonio. “Supremo Tribunal de Justicia implementará firma electrónica.” W Radio. December 7, 2018.

Diario Oficial de la Federación. “DOF: 07/12/2018.” Secretaría de Gobernación. December 12, 2018.

Cruz Romo, Ezequiel. “Repiten president en el STJEJ.” El Diario NTF Guadalajara. December 14, 2018.

Police lack training in the New Criminal Justice System

Data collected by INEGI show insufficient levels of training completed by Mexican Police throughout the country.

12/04/18 (written by kheinle) — Recent reports indicate that the majority of Mexican police are insufficiently trained on the New Criminal Justice System (Nuevo Sistema de Justicia Penal, NSJP). Just over half of all police have attended only one of three required NSJP-related trainings, according to the National Institute of Statistics and Geography (Instituto Nacional de Estadística y Geografía, INEGI). Meanwhile, 80% of Mexican police have concerns over the system’s implementation.

As outlined by the Ministry of the Interior (Secretaría de Gobernación, SEGOB), one of the required workshops focuses on first responders, scene preservation, and evidence collection. Only 12 of Mexico’s 32 states and Federal District (Distrito Federal, DF) have had over 50% of its officers complete this training. The second course covers the role of police in the beginning stages of a case’s investigation. Only six states have had at least 50% of its forces trained. The third training focuses on the joint criminal investigation involving preventative and investigative police. Even fewer states – four – have had at least half comply. Only two states have had a majority of their police complete all three trainings: Chiapas and Coahuila.

One reason for the police’s insufficient training, argued Alberto Capella, Quintana Roo’s Minister of Public Security, is the flawed structural design of the NSJP’s implementation period, which spanned eight years (2008-2016). In an article by Noticieras Televisa, Capella notes that little pressure was put on local governments to ensure their police were sufficiently trained until the end of that eight-year window. Chihuahua Attorney General César Peniche also commented on the unequal levels of training among judicial system operators. He argued that the criminal justice system must adapt in order to fill these voids.

For his part, a professor of Criminal Justice at the University of Barcelona in Spain and a native of San Luis Potosí, David Ordaz Hernández commented on the overall stagnation in the implementation of the NSJP. He faulted the lack of training of justice system operators—including police—as a main reason for its delay. Insufficient training often leads to judicial processes being done by hand, he argued. The operators do not have the learned methodology or full understanding of the system, and these inefficiencies add up.

In November, several municipal mayors and local officials acknowledged the insufficient levels of training. As reported by news source Multi Medios, Cristina Díaz, the mayor of Guadalupe, Nuevo León, for example, said that in addition to fully training police forces, they also ought to work with police in the traffic division (“los agentes de tránsito”). Other local officials, however, defended the progress of their municipalities and their efficiency with processing the law.

Sources:

“México enfrenta reto de seguridad y aumento en homicidios, análisis en despierta.” Noticieros Televisa. November 8, 2018.

Villasena, Mayte. “Se comprometen alcaldes metropolitanos a capacitar a policías.” Multimedios. November 14, 2018.

Martínez, Abel. “Policías de México no han sido actualizados en Sistema de Justicia Penal.” Tribuna Noticias. November 22, 2018.

Morales, Rosa María. “El Nuevo Sistema de Justicia Penal, aún en pañales: David Ordaz.” Pulso – Diario de San Luis. November 26, 2018.