Wife of “El Chapo” Pleads Guilty to Drug and Money Laundering Charges

06/14/2021 (written by rramos) – The U.S. Department of Justice announced on June 10 that Emma Coronel Aispuro, wife of jailed Sinaloa Cartel leader Joaquín “El Chapo” Guzmán Loera, pleaded guilty to several criminal charges related to drug trafficking and money laundering. The charges included conspiracy to distribute cocaine, heroin, methamphetamine, and marijuana in the United States; conspiracy to launder drug proceeds; and violating the Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act by engaging in financial transactions and dealings with property belonging to Guzmán, who remains sanctioned by the U.S. Department of the Treasury. 

According to Anthony Nardozzi, the federal prosecutor handling the case, Coronel’s role in the Sinaloa Cartel also included delivering messages from her imprisoned husband to cartel operatives after Guzmán’s 2016 arrest, allowing him to remain involved in the group’s operations from behind bars. Additionally, Nardozzi stated that Coronel had collaborated with El Chapo’s sons to “plan and coordinate” attempts to help Guzmán escape from prison, including his successful 2015 breakout from Altiplano federal prison in Mexico. 

Coronel’s defense attorney, Jeffrey Lichtman, told the Associated Press that his client did not plead guilty as part of a deal to cooperate with federal investigators, but instead was aiming to receive a shorter prison term when she is sentenced in September. Nevertheless, Mike Vigil, a former head of international operations for the U.S. Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) speculated that Coronel may ultimately decide to work with authorities in exchange for getting her 9-year-old twin daughters (fathered by Guzmán) and herself into some sort of witness-protection program in the United States. 

Source: Dana Verkouteren, Associated Press

U.S. Investigators Targeting Families of Sinaloa Cartel Leaders

Emma Coronel’s guilty plea comes as U.S. authorities continue to target close relatives of the Sinaloa Cartel’s leading figures. Within the family of “El Chapo” Guzmán, U.S. law enforcement agencies have steadily increased their attention on his sons, often referred to collectively as “Los Chapitos.” Two sons from his first wife, Jesús Alfredo and Iván Archivaldo Guzmán Salazar, are regarded as particularly important actors within the Sinaloa network. Jesús Alfredo has appeared on DEA’s most wanted list since 2018, while Iván Archivaldo remains sanctioned by the U.S. Treasury Department under the Kingpin Act for being identified as a “key Sinaloa Cartel operative.” Another two sons, Ovidio and Joaquín Guzmán López, both from El Chapo’s second marriage, were accused by U.S. prosecutors of participating in the cartel’s drug trafficking activities in an indictment unsealed in February 2019. U.S. investigators’ interest in Ovidio was illustrated by the failed operation to arrest him in Culiacán, Sinaloa in October 2019, an operation that reportedly originated from the aforementioned U.S. indictment against him earlier that year. 

Another Sinaloa Cartel kingpin whose family continues to be pursued by U.S. authorities is Ismael “El Mayo” Zambada García, who had been among El Chapo’s closest associates for many years. In April 2021, Ismael Zambada Imperial, known also by the criminal alias “Mayito Gordo,” pled guilty to drug trafficking charges in a federal court in San Diego. Along with Zambada Imperial, three other sons of El Mayo have also been in the crosshairs of U.S. investigators. Vicente “El Vicentillo” Zambada Niebla, who was a key witness in El Chapo’s criminal trial, and Serafin Zambada Ortiz have both been convicted of criminal charges in the United States, while Ismael Zambada Sicairos, known as “Mayito Flaco,” remains at large after being indicted in 2014. The U.S. Treasury Department has also reportedly sanctioned multiple companies established by El Mayo’s wife, Rosario Niebla Cardoza, and several of his daughters that U.S. authorities allege are used for laundering ill-gotten proceeds from cartel operations.  

Internal Disputes Continue to Rage On in Mexico

As the U.S. Government continues to go after the inner circles of the Sinaloa Cartel’s most prominent members, the organization itself remains engulfed in an internal conflict in which El Mayo and Los Chapitos are apparently competing for influence within the group. The dispute is playing out in a series of violent confrontations in some of the Sinaloa Cartel’s traditional strongholds in northwestern Mexico, such as Sonora, Sinaloa, and Durango. Intra-Sinaloa Cartel violence has been particularly acute in the strategically important border state of Baja California. The state’s capital city of Mexicali, which saw a marked increase in homicides throughout the early months of 2021, suffered additional clashes linked to infighting between El Mayo and Los Chapitos as recently as May 2021.

Although some observers have argued that Emma Coronel’s recent guilty plea paves the way for her to provide U.S. authorities with critical information regarding the inner workings of the Sinaloa Cartel, it is unclear if these insights (even if shared with investigators) will be able to help prevent further divisions within the organization once headed by her husband. 

Sources

“Jesús Alfredo Guzmán: Estados Unidos incluye al hijo de “El Chapo” en la lista de los 10 fugitivos más buscados.” BBC. September 14, 2018.  

Romo, Vanessa. “Sons Of ‘El Chapo’ Indicted On Drug Conspiracy Charge.” National Public Radio. February 21, 2019. 

McGinnis, Teagan. “The Capture and Release of Ovidio Guzmán in Culiacán, Sinaloa.” Justice in Mexico. November 5, 2019. 

“Forman 6 mujeres escudo financiero del ‘Mayo’” El Universal. June 24, 2020. 

“Los Chapitos.” InSight Crime. July 2, 2020. 

Gutiérrez González, Rodrigo. “Cuál es el verdadero papel de Ovidio Guzmán en el Cártel de Sinaloa?” La Silla Rota. October 15, 2020. 

Vela, David Saúl. “DEA busca a 9 líderes del narcotráfico en México, Caro Quintero es el número 1 de la lista.” El Financiero. November 23, 2020. 

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Castillo García, Gustavo. “Al alza, la disputa en estados del norte por trasiego de fentanilo.” La Jornada. March 14, 2021. 

Domínguez, Francisco. “De enero a marzo, Mexicali registra el mayor número de homicidios en 16 años.” Monitor Económico de Baja California. April 14, 2021. 

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“Violento enfrentamiento entre sicarios y policías en la tierra del Mayo enciende las alarmas.” InfoBae. April 22, 2021. 

Davis, Kristina. “Son of Sinaloa Cartel kingpin pleads guilty in San Diego.” San Diego Union-Tribune. April 30, 2021. 

Thornton, Kelly. “Sinaloa Cartel Leader Convicted.” U.S. Department of Justice. April 30, 2021. 

“‘Los Mayos’ atacan Mexicali.” Zeta Tijuana. May 3, 2021. 

Cohn, Scott. “El Chapo’s wife, Emma Coronel, could hold the keys to dismantling the world’s most dangerous drug cartel.” CNBC. June 4, 2021. 

“Sanctions Pursuant To The Foreign Narcotics Kingpin Designation Act.” U.S. Department of the Treasury. June 8, 2021. 16. 

“Emma Coronel Aispuro, wife of Mexican drug kingpin Joaquin ‘El Chapo’ Guzman, pleads guilty to helping run his criminal empire.” Chicago Tribune. June 10, 2021.

“Wife of “El Chapo” Pleads Guilty to Drug Trafficking and Money Laundering.” U.S. Department of Justice. June 10, 2021. 

Balsamo, Michael. “Wife of drug kingpin ‘El Chapo’ pleads guilty to US charges.” Associated Press. June 10, 2021. 

Hsu, Spencer S. “Wife of ‘El Chapo’ Guzmán pleads guilty to aiding husband’s drug-trafficking empire.” Washington Post. June 10, 2021. 

Tau, Byron & de Córdoba, José. “El Chapo’s Wife Emma Coronel Pleads Guilty to Helping Run Global Drug Cartel.” Wall Street Journal. June 10, 2021. 

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